The Home of American Intellectual Conservatism — First Principles

December 15, 2017

FEATURE ARTICLES
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The New Classical Schooling
Peter J. Leithart - 01/29/08
Notes
  1. Quoted in Paul Franco, Michael Oakeshott: An Introduction (New Haven, CT: Yale, 2004), 122–23.
  2. Quoted in ibid., 122.
  3. I must declare an interest—in fact, many interests: my own children attend the Logos School in Moscow, Idaho; my oldest son teaches at a Classical Christian school in Cary, North Carolina; I teach at New St. Andrews College, a four-year Classical Christian liberal arts school; and a number of the leaders of classical education are personal friends.
  4. See, for instance, D. H. Williams, Evangelicals and Tradition: The Formative Influence of the Early Church (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker, 2005). The evangelical reevaluation of Roman Catholicism is one dimension of the same trend. See Mark A. Noll and Carolyn Nystrom, Is the Reformation Over? An Evangelical Assessment of Contemporary Roman Catholicism (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker, 2005).
  5. Personal e-mail communication, October 27, 2007.
  6. Veith and Kern, Classical Education: The Movement Sweeping America (Washington, DC: Capital Research Center, 2001), 117.
  7. Here and hereafter, all quotations from Andrew Kern, unless otherwise attributed, are drawn from personal e-mail communication, October 17 and 29 and November 2, 2007. More whimsically, Kern says the source of the whole movement is the Chronicles of Narnia: “C. S. Lewis made classical Christians of all of us when we were little kids and fell in love with Tumnus the faun, Bacchus the river God, and the power of mythology understood in a Christian classical tradition with strong Platonic leanings.”
  8. Here and hereafter, all quotations from Ken Myers, unless otherwise attributed, are drawn from personal e-mail communication, October 9, 2007.
  9. Description from the Trivium School website, www.triviumschool.com.
  10. See www.catholicliberaleducation.org.
  11. See www.love2learn.net/bkbteduc/classic.htm.
  12. Veith and Kern, Classical Education, 11.
  13. Sayers, “The Lost Tools of Learning,” available at www.gbt.org/text/sayers.html.
  14. The notion of “liberal arts” as opposed to “practical arts” first developed in Greece, and by the early Middle Ages had been summed up in seven subjects divided into the Trivium (grammar, dialectic, rhetoric) and the Quadrivium (arithmetic, astronomy, geometry, and music). On this development, see David L. Wagner, “The Seven Liberal Arts and Classical Scholarship” in The Seven Liberal Arts in the Middle Ages , ed. David Wagner (Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1986), 3–31; see also Paul Abelson, The Seven Liberal Arts: A Study in Medieval Culture (New York: Columbia Teacher’s College, 1906), 1–10.
  15. Sayers, “Lost Tools.”
  16. Ibid.
  17. Wilson, “A Review of Wisdom and Eloquence,” Classis (August 2007), 1.
  18. Wilson recounts the formation of Logos School and its associated organizations in The Cast for Classical Christian Education (Wheaton, IL: Crossway Books, 2003), chapter 10. See also Veith and Kern, Classical Education, chapter 3.
  19. Veith and Kern, Classical Education, 18.
  20. Statistics provided by ACCS executive director Patch Blakey.
  21. Littlejohn and Evans, Wisdom and Eloquence (Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 2006), 39, 74, 115.
  22. Here and hereafter, all quotations from Gene Veith, unless otherwise attributed, are drawn from personal e-mail communication, October 30, 2007.
  23. Veith and Kern, Classical Education, 25.
  24. Personal e-mail communication, October 9, 2007.
  25. Personal e-mail communication, November 2, 2007.
  26. Personal e-mail communication, November 2, 2007.
  27. Quoted in Veith and Kern, Classical Education, 30.
  28. The most thorough introduction to these versions of classical education can be found in Veith and Kern, Classical Education.
  29. Information from National Center for Education Statistics, for fall 2006, available at nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d06/tables/dt06_001.asp.
  30. From the SCL website, www.societyforclassicallearning.org/index.cfm.
  31. Letter to the editor, Classis, forthcoming, provided by ACCS executive director Patch Blakey.
  32. Wilson, The Case For Classical Christian Education, chapter 3.
  33. Veith and Kern, Classical Education, 10.
  34. See Kraig Beyerlein, “Educational Elites and the Movement to Secularize Public Education: The Case of the National Education Association,” in The Secular Revolution: Power, Interests, and Conflict in the Secularization of American Public Life, ed. Christian Smith (Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2003), 160–96.
  35. George M. Thomas, Lisa R. Peck, and Channin G. De Haan, “Reforming Education, Transforming Religion, 1876–1931,” in Smith, Secular Revolution (see note 34), 355–94.
  36. This connection is neatly, sometimes profoundly, examined by Roger Lundin, From Nature to Experience: The American Search for Cultural Authority (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2007).
  37. Lee Pearcy, The Grammar of Our Civility: Classical Education in America (Waco, TX: Baylor, 2005), 65–71.
  38. Ibid., 61.
  39. Ibid., 46.
  40. Quoted in ibid., 47.
  41. Ibid., 52.
  42. Quoted in ibid., 52.
  43. Quoted in ibid., 53.
  44. Ibid., 71.
  45. Quoted in Franco, Michael Oakeshott, 119.
  46. See the Schola Classical Tutorials website, www.scholatutorials.org.
  47. Scholegium 2:18 (September 26, 2007), available at www.scholatutorials.org.
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